McClintick Real Estate, Inc.



Posted by McClintick Real Estate, Inc. on 12/14/2017

It has been said that owning a dog is like having a two year old that stays two for his entire life. There is some truth in this statement. Dogs--like children--have many needs, and each dog has a unique personality. But, as any dog owner will tell you, there is no greater joy than coming home to your tail-wagging, slobbering best friend. There are several factors you should consider before getting a dog. You'll want to think about how much time you have to spend with the dog, your family's ability to contribute to caring for him or her, and how suitable your home and yard are.

Your dog's new home

If you've always wanted a large, playful dog, you should think about the size of your home and yard. Big dogs and dogs with high energy need a lot of room to run around in. If you live on a busy road would you consider putting up a fence to keep your dog safe from traffic? If not you might have to tether your dog to a run in the backyard, which is significantly less fun and exercise for the both of you. Inside the home poses another challenge. If you are considering a puppy, know that there is much†training involved to keep your dog safe and your house in one piece. One of the many benefits of adopting an older dog is that they tend to already be housebroken, avoiding a lot of clean-ups and chewed furniture.

Raising a dog is a team effort

If you are thinking about getting a puppy or a high energy dog (in other words, a "permanent puppy") it's important to recognize that your whole family will have to be on the same page when it comes to training. Your dog takes cues from your family's behavior. So if one person in your family allows the dog to jump up on them when another doesn't it will give the dog mixed signals. This is also true for rewarding good behavior. Your dog should obey each member of your family because they trust them, not fear them or feel dominant over them. Play-time and treats are a great way to build that trust with every member of your household.

Please consider adopting

We all have the image in our heads of our children playing with a new puppy. But the same joy and bonding can come from adopting an older dog. When you adopt, you can teach your kids the value of rescuing and caring for animals that have been neglected. What's more, adopting is also a way to show support for shelters rather than puppy mills who often breed puppies in poor†conditions.

Guidelines for dogs and your home

  • If you have a small home and yard, get a small dog or an older, low-energy dog
  • Likewise, take the dog on lots of walk to make up for missed exercise in the yard
  • If you have a wooded yard be extra vigilant about ticks and fleas
  • Training never ends for you or your dog. Make sure you are constantly working with your dog





Posted by McClintick Real Estate, Inc. on 12/12/2017


111 Middlesex Road, Merrimack, NH 03054

Rental

$1,650
Price

2
Bedrooms
7
Rooms
2/1
Full/Half Baths
Desirable townhouse rental at Society Hill Condos., 2 bedrooms and den on second level. Master bedroom has private 3/4 bath and large walk-in closet. Deck off kitchen. Finished walkout basement. Fully applianced. Economical natural gas heat. 1 year lease. No smoking in unit. 1 pet under 20lbs considered. Showings start December 16.
Open House
No scheduled Open Houses






Tags: Merrimack   Real estate   Rental   03054  
Categories: New Homes  


Posted by McClintick Real Estate, Inc. on 12/7/2017

Whether new or old, many homes can have issues that arenít obvious from photos. Many of the most common problems in a home have to do with the plumbing system. Since water can be so damaging, itís especially important to get these issues out in the open prior to sale.

Some sellers might be aware of their plumbing issues, others may have no clue at all. Oftentimes, if a home was previously occupied by only one or two people who didnít entertain many guests, they may not be aware of the strain that a larger family could have on things like the septic system.

In this article, weíll cover some of the most common plumbing issues that a home has and help you identify these issues before you buy a new home.

The small fixes

Letís start with some problems that are common and simple to address. When touring a home or performing an inspection, test all of the homeís faucets. Dripping faucets might not seem like a big issue, but the cost of wasted water can add up on your utility bill.

Leaking pipes are another issue that is seemingly harmless, but can lead to bigger problems that could cost thousands of dollars to repair. Check ceilings, floors, and underneath cabinets for signs of water damage.

Flush the toilets in the house to see if they continue running. Toilets that continue running water is often a simple fix, like replacing the chain or flapper in the tank. However, a leaking toilet could be symptomatic of a bigger problem that could include having to replace the toilet.

Sewer line and septic systems

Ask the owner about the history of the sewer or septic system. Find out if theyíve had problems recently and when the last time they were taken care of. If there is a septic tank or field on the property, look for signs of issues such as the grass having been dug out, water pooling in the yard, or foul smells in the area.

When it comes to septic and sewer issues, always reach out to a professional. They will be able to give you an accurate assessment and estimate of costs.

Inspect the pipes

Spot-checking the pipes in the home will tell you a lot about the state of the plumbing. Pipes that are old, worn, and lacking insulation are signs that plumbing issues could be coming. Rust is a major red flag. The water lines that lead out of the house for lawn faucets should also be wrapped to avoid freezing in the winter months.

Hot water heater

Just like the septic system, youíll want to ask about the history of the homeís hot water heater. If itís over ten years old, you might have to replace it soon after purchase.

You should also consider the size of the hot water heater. Youíll want to be sure it can accommodate your expected water usage. If children are in your future, having a bigger hot water heater might be something you want to plan for to avoid cold showers in the morning.





Posted by McClintick Real Estate, Inc. on 11/30/2017

Going away on your vacation should be a time of relaxation and enjoyment. For some of us, however, we spend some of that time worrying about our homes, our pets, and all of the housework we have to catch up on when we get back.

One way to alleviate some of this anxiety is to employ a house-sitter while youíre away. In this article, weíre going to talk about getting your home ready for the sitter so that they can keep things running smoothly while youíre away.

Finding a house-sitter

There are three groups of people you should consult about finding a house-sitter for your home: friends, family, and neighbors. Many young people still living with their parents will be happy to get away for a week or two and have a house to themselves for a change.

An added benefit of asking an acquaintance or relative is that you can usually be assured that theyíll take good care of your home while youíre away.


In terms of payment, leaving them money for groceries and delivery is a good way to thank them for watching your house and pets while you were away.

Getting your house ready for the sitter

You might be at a loss of where to begin when it comes to leaving a note of things to do while youíre away. A good way to make sure you donít miss anything is to keep a list in your phone and add to it throughout the day whenever you complete a task that you want the house-sitter to do.

Youíll also want to make sure you provide contact numbers for you and whoever else is away on vacation with you, and store the house-sitterís number in your phones as well.

Next, make sure your home is emergency-ready. That includes checking the smoke detector and flashlight batteries. If you have a security system, itís a good idea to let them know that someone will be watching your home while youíre away and provide their name in case your house-sitter accidentally sets off the alarm.

Finally, take care of anything you need to do before leaving, such as paying utility bills, putting fresh linens in the bedroom and bathroom, and parking your unused vehicles in a safe place.

Tip: It might be a good idea to lock or hide any alcohol, tobacco, etc. thatís in the house, especially if your house-sitter is underage.

Now, letís talk about some things to include on your list to leave for the house-sitter:

  • Recycling information (sort or no-sort)

  • Which day to take out the garbage cans and recycling

  • Information about pets: when/how much to feed, treats, walks, when they need to go outside, which vet to call in case of emergency, etc.

  • Location of keys for shed, house, etc.

  • Garage door opener

  • Reminder to take in the mail

  • Pool filter and cleaning procedure

  • Watering plants





Posted by McClintick Real Estate, Inc. on 11/23/2017

More areas are struggling with droughts today. Conserving water has become a necessity. Even if the area you live in isnít drought-stricken, cutting back on water use has many benefits for you and the environment. Youíll have a lower utility bill for one. Youíll also help to conserve the most precious resource on the planet. Thereís plenty of ways that you can conserve water. Youíll be happy that you implemented some of these tips into your daily routine. Small changes in your life can make a big impact on your water bill and the environment. 


Turn Off Water While You Brush Your Teeth Or Wash Your Hands


Did you know that water comes out of the faucet at an average of 2.5 gallons per minute? Thatís quite a lot of water to waste while youíre merely brushing your teeth or washing your hands. Turn off the tap while you brush (youíre supposed to brush for 2 full minutes!) or scrub your hands. Think of how many gallons of water youíll save over a weekís time if you shut the water off even for those few seconds! Water is a precious resource and we should use it wisely. 


Put A Bucket In The Shower


This sounds like kind of a crazy idea. You know how long it takes the shower to heat up every morning, and now you can save that water which normally heads down the drain. Place a bucket in the tub while the water heats up. You can use that water later for watering plant or keeping the lawn fresh. This way, nothing will go to waste! 


Take A Shorter Shower


We all love to hang out in the shower for a bit, but taking a shower is one of the biggest uses of water in our homes. A shower uses about 2.1 gallons of water per minute. That means the typical 8 minute shower consumes somewhere around 16 gallons of water. If you cut your showers by even one minute, youíd save 14 gallons of water a week! Thatís nothing to sneeze at! 


Flush Less


You know the old saying, ďIf itís yellow let it mellow.Ē Maybe this tip isnít for everyone, but your toilet is the fixture that uses the most water in your home. Higher efficiency toilets use about 1.5 gallons per flush, but older toilets can use anywhere between 3.5 and 7 gallons of water per flush! Consider flushing the toilet a bit less for the sake of water conservation! 


Load The Dishwasher Fully


The dishwasher is a fantastic invention and a necessity in our homes. Every time you run the dishwasher, it uses between 4 and 6 gallons of water. When you run the machine, be sure that itís full of dirty dishes to avoid putting it on too often.