McClintick Real Estate, Inc.



Posted by McClintick Real Estate, Inc. on 11/8/2018

If you’re hoping to buy a home in the near future, there are a number of financial factors you’ll need to consider.

One of the factors that all lenders will consider when determining whether or not to approve you for a mortgage is credit score.

In this article, we’ll lay out the minimum and ideal credit scores that are needed for getting approved for a home loan.

Determining Your Score

As you may guess, credit reporting is a complicated business. There are three main reporting companies that lenders use to determine your credit: Experian, TransUnion, and Equifax. These companies largely collect the same data about your finances, but can have minor variations. Lenders will take these scores and use the median or middle score to determine your credit rating.

Thanks to the Fair Credit Reporting Act, Americans have the ability to confirm the accuracy of their reports.

If you want to find your credit score, there are a number of online reporting agencies that will show you your report for free on an annual or monthly basis.

Minimum credit scores

Depending on the type of loan you’re applying for and which lender you are pursuing, minimum credit scores vary.

For those seeking first-time homeowner (FHA) loans, you’ll need a credit score of at least 580 to qualify for a 3.5% down payment. A score lower than this amount and you will need to put at least 10% down.

Since FHA loans are insured by the government, you are more likely to be approved if you have a low or “poor” or “bad” credit score (usually anywhere from 300 to 650).

Another type of loan that could help people with low credit is offered by the Department of Veteran’s Affairs. These loans, known as VA loans, are guaranteed, in part, by the government. However, the loans are still approved and distributed by lenders who all have varying minimum credit requirements. A good benchmark is that you’ll need a score of at least 620 to be approved.

Minimum isn’t ideal

While you may get approved for a loan with a low credit, this isn’t always a reason to celebrate.

Lenders use your credit score, among other things, to help determine the interest rate of your loan. A lower score often means a higher interest rate.

While 1 or 2 percent can seem like a small number, it can mean paying tens of thousands of dollars more in interest over the span of a thirty-year loan.

To illustrate the importance of one percent, consider the following. If you owe $200,000 on a home and intend to pay it over 30 years, you will pay $103,000 in interest at 3% and $143,000 at 4% - that’s a difference of $40,000.

Rather than shooting for the minimum credit score, a better approach would be to build credit while saving for a down payment. Someone with a credit score of 740 or higher will be seen by most mortgage lenders as an ideal person to lend to.

Of course, life doesn’t always allow for the ideal situation. So, do your best to save and build credit, and be sure to shop around for the best rates when you’re ready.





Posted by McClintick Real Estate, Inc. on 11/1/2018

Selling a house should be an enjoyable experience – not a stressful one. Yet problems may arise that cause a home seller's stress levels to rise. Fortunately, we're here to help you identify and alleviate home selling issues before they get out of hand.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to help you enjoy a worry-free house selling experience.

1. Learn About the Real Estate Market

Take a look at the prices of houses in your city or town. By doing so, you can see how your residence stacks up against comparable houses and determine how you should price your home.

Furthermore, evaluate the prices of recently sold houses in your area. This housing market data enables you to see how long it takes houses to sell and whether property sellers are receiving offers to purchase at or above their residences' initial asking prices. Then, you can find out whether you are preparing to enter a buyer's or seller's market and plan accordingly.

2. Identify Your House's Strengths and Weaknesses

Conduct a home inspection – you'll be glad you did. An inspection takes only a few hours to complete and enables a property expert to review your residence both inside and out. After the inspection is finished, you'll receive a report that highlights any underlying problems with your residence. You then can use this report to prioritize home repairs and transform property weaknesses into strengths.

It may be beneficial to remove clutter from inside your house and enhance your residence's curb appeal too. That way, you can make it easy for homebuyers to fall in love with your house whenever they view it.

3. Collaborate with a Real Estate Agent

A real estate agent is a home selling professional who is happy to help you navigate the property selling journey. In fact, he or she will make it easy to minimize stress from the moment you list your house to the day you complete your home closing.

Usually, a real estate agent will learn about you and your home selling goals and craft a custom property selling strategy. A real estate agent next will set up home showings and open house events to promote your residence to prospective buyers. And if a buyer submits an offer to purchase your home, a real estate agent will help you decide whether to accept, reject or counter this proposal.

Let's not forget about a real estate agent's industry expertise, either. A real estate agent understands the ins and outs of the house selling journey. And if you ever have concerns or questions about selling your home, a real estate agent is ready to respond to them.

The home selling journey may seem daunting at first. But ultimately, there is no need to stress as you prepare to list your house. Take advantage of the aforementioned tips, and you can boost the likelihood of a worry-free home selling experience.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by McClintick Real Estate, Inc. on 10/25/2018

?Artificial Intelligence, or AI, is the latest technology hitting shelves and being brought into homes. We now not only have the ability to control various devices in our home from an app on our phone but we can also create reports to gain insight into how we use them. Data enthusiasts unite!

The Nest learning thermostat is every Dad’s best friend. You now have the hard data to back up why everyone needs to keep the house temperature exactly where you set it. And if anyone does turn it up you can turn it back down right from your phone.

Nest can also go into away mode when it detects that no one is home. Think of it like sleep mode for your laptop… but for the whole house. This thermostat wants to help you be more efficient with heat, and your hard earned dollars, by alerting you when it makes sense to lower temps.

If you are a data enthusiast you can use reports to see how much energy you’ve used throughout the week and/or month. Let’s be honest that’s enough to make us all data enthusiast converts.

Nest Cam IQ allows you to keep watch over your domain. It has face recognition capabilities and high-quality footage to recognize family members, frequent visitors, and intruders. When you add the Nest Aware feature you can even get updates right on your phone of the comings and goings of your home.

With microphone capability, you’re able to speak to those in the room, even if your two towns over. Keep your home safe, dogs off of the couch and teens from breaking house rules. And night mode utilized LED lights to get clear pictures for 24/7 film coverage.

Nest Protect is the smart smoke and carbon monoxide alarm you wish you always had. It recognizes the difference between smoke and steam which means no more obnoxious false alarms when cooking. You can use your towels solely for drying your hands again.

If that alarm happens to go off when you aren’t home it alerts your phone so you’re in the know at all times. It even warns you when the alarm is about to go off so it does scare the bejeezus out of you. As in it actually says “Heads up. There’s smoke in the kitchen” (or whichever room it’s installed in).

Nest Protect even has a motion detector and nightlight. So it knows to give you a little light as you walk by at night. You don’t have to choose between stumbling in the dark or fighting bleary-eyed through the brightness of normal lighting.

One last thing: if you upgrade to a Rheem water heater you can sync it up to your Nest Protect. Why would you want to do that? If one of your alarms does go off you can set up a trigger reaction where your water heater will shut off. It can also sync up to your Nest thermostat and turn the heat off as well.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by McClintick Real Estate, Inc. on 10/18/2018

In a high competition market, you may be tempted to do whatever you can to entice the seller to accept your offer. Buyers write offer letters, provide large down payments, or waive the inspection. Sometimes, this strategy includes removing contingencies from your contract. 


Beware. Removing contingencies can easily become a nightmare for you as a buyer. Certain contingencies should be kept no matter how much you think you should waive them for enticement. 


The Home Inspection Contingency


This contingency is basically universally recommended by realtors everywhere. This contingency allows you to get a licensed home inspector who will check the property. The inspection typically should be done about 7 days from the time you sign the purchase agreement for the home. 


Following the inspection, you as the buyer can request that the seller make certain repairs. The seller can either make the repairs or provide a counter offer. If you’re not satisfied or cannot reach an agreement, you can back out of the deal and still get your money back. 


Without this contingency, you’ll never know what’s wrong with the home until you move in it. It’s a huge risk to take to move into a home without understanding all of its moving parts. Is the roof stable? Has the basement flooded? Will the appliances last? There are plenty of questions that you might have about a home that can be answered simply through an inspection. 


Financing Contingency


This is an important contingency. Your offer on the property will depend on being able to get the financing you need to purchase the home. With this protection in place, in the event that you can’t get a loan, you’ll get your deposit on the home back. Be sure that the clause specifies the number of days that would be recommended by your lender to have the mortgage approved.   


Appraisal Contingency


This could be the most important contingency of all. This protection could possibly save you thousands of dollars of a headache. Once an offer is accepted on a home, you’re far from done. The lender will typically order an appraisal. If the appraisal comes in lower than the offer you made on the home and agreed to pay, you may have some problems. 


The lender will only lend you what the house is worth. If the appraisal comes in lower, you’ll need to make up for tens of thousands of dollars out of pocket. Make sure you have an appraisal contingency included in your contracts!  


As you buy a home, remember how important contingencies can be in the process.            




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by McClintick Real Estate, Inc. on 10/11/2018

If you're currently renting an apartment or house, it makes good financial sense to consider becoming a homeowner in the foreseeable future. There are pros and cons to owning your own home -- and it's not for everyone -- but for most people, the advantages far outweigh the disadvantages.

An exception would be if your job requires you to relocate frequently. In that scenario, the potential benefits of building up equity in a home would be greatly diminished.

On the other hand, if you plan on staying put for more than a few years, then the tax benefits and investment value of owning real estate could put you on a stronger financial track than if you continued shelling out your hard-earned money to a landlord. You've probably heard the argument before: "If you pay rent, you have nothing to show for it at the end of the year". However, when you buy a home, an increasing portion of your monthly payments is applied to your actual ownership of the property (as opposed to how much you owe the bank).

Tax Advantages of Home Ownership

In most cases, you can deduct all of your home mortgage interest from your federal tax returns, according to the IRS. More specifically: "The only costs you can deduct are real estate taxes actually paid to the taxing authority, interest that qualifies as home mortgage interest, and mortgage insurance premiums."

However, since everyone's financial situation is different and there is no "one size fits all" approach to financial management, it's always best to consult with an experienced CPA, enrolled agent, or knowledgeable tax preparer. There may be other tax benefits you could qualify for as a homeowner, too, including getting tax credits for installing a solar energy system. The government's Energy Star program says tax credits on new solar energy systems are available through the year 2021.

Getting the Process Underway

Two key steps to becoming a home owner are finding out your credit score and meeting with a mortgage lender to determine how much of a real estate loan you could qualify for. An experienced real estate agent can also provide you with a wealth of guidance and information on how to become a homeowner. They can fill you in on many of the exact steps, requirements, and advantages of buying your first home. A buyers' agent can also help you assess your readiness to take the plunge into home ownership.

In addition to finding out your credit score, which will impact your mortgage interest rate and the type of loan you may qualify for, other vital information can be gleaned from a detailed personal budget. Although the amount of rent you now pay will provide some insights into your potential house-buying budget, there are a lot of variables which will impact how much of a mortgage you could comfortably afford.