McClintick Real Estate, Inc.

Posted by McClintick Real Estate, Inc. on 3/15/2018

As a home seller, receiving the first offer on your residence can be an exciting experience. However, the initial offer on your home may prove to be insufficient for a number of reasons, including:

1. The offer fails to meet your expectations.

Ideally, a home seller will allocate the necessary time and resources to fully analyze a house before adding it to the real estate market. This will enable a home seller to establish realistic expectations for his or her house and price it accordingly.

Conducting a home appraisal offers a great starting point for a home seller to determine the true value of a residence. This appraisal ensures a home inspector will examine a residence's interior and exterior. Then, the inspector will provide a report that details a house's strengths and weaknesses.

With a home appraisal report in hand, a home seller should have no trouble establishing a "fair" price for his or her residence. And if an initial offer falls short of this price, a home seller can politely decline the proposal and wait for additional offers.

2. The homebuyer has submitted a "lowball" proposal.

In some instances, a homebuyer may submit a "lowball" offer in the hopes of acquiring a terrific house at a budget-friendly price. If a home seller cannot differentiate between a reasonable offer and a lowball proposal, he or she risks missing out on an opportunity to optimize the value of a residence.

An informed home seller should examine the prices of available houses that are similar to his or her own. By doing so, this property seller can see how his or her residence stacks up against the competition and map out the home selling journey accordingly.

Moreover, an informed home seller will mow the front lawn, trim the hedges and do whatever it takes to enhance a house's curb appeal. This home seller likely understands the importance of making a positive first impression on homebuyers, and as a result, will perform assorted home exterior improvements to help reduce the risk of receiving a lowball initial offer.

3. The offer does not correspond to the current state of the housing market.

For a home seller, it is essential to work with a real estate agent who can provide full details about the current state of the housing market.

A real estate agent can help a home seller differentiate between a buyer's market and a seller's market. Plus, this housing market professional can provide honest, unbiased recommendations about whether a home seller should decline an initial offer on a home.

Many real estate agents are available in cities and towns nationwide, and these housing market experts are happy to help home sellers in any way they can. If you employ a real estate agent before you list your home, you can reap the benefits of unparalleled guidance at each stage of the home selling journey.

There is no reason to settle for a subpar initial offer on your residence. Instead, consider a first offer closely, and you can make an informed decision about whether to decline or accept it.

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Posted by McClintick Real Estate, Inc. on 3/8/2018

Buying a home is a complicated process with a lot of opportunities to make costly mistakes. There’s no high school class to prepare you for buying a home but there probably should be. If you’re a first time homebuyer and you came across this article looking for advice, congratulations--you’re already doing the most important thing you can when making a big financial decision: the research.

In this article, we’ll cover some of the most common mistakes that first time homebuyers make when entering the real estate market. We’ll break it down by the three main phases of home-buying: saving for a home, hunting for a home, and signing a mortgage.

Saving for a home

One of the first lessons that all first time homeowners quickly learn is that being able to afford your monthly mortgage payments doesn’t mean you can afford a home. Many first time buyers are often coming from living situations where certain utilities are included (water, heat, electricity, etc.). Aside from those obvious expenses, there are also things like property tax and home insurance to budget for, both of which may increase. Finally, when you’re living in an apartment and your faucet breaks, you simply call the landlord. When you own a home, especially an older home, be prepared to spend on repairs and to start learning basic maintenance skills that will save you money.

The hunt for your first home

Now that you’re aware of the costs, it might be tempting to jump in and start looking at homes. Another common mistake first time homebuyers make is to waste time looking at homes before they’ve met with a real estate agent or have gotten pre-approved for a loan. Start there, then once you know the scope of your home search, you’ll have a much more relaxing hunt for your new home.

Another mistake that first time homebuyers make is to underestimate the time and commitment it takes to find a home. When you work with a real estate agent, make sure you are available at all times. Keep your phone nearby, stick to your schedule for viewing homes, and keep a list of each home you’re considering. Showing initiative and dedication won’t just help you stay organized, it will also show your agent and the home seller that you are worth their time.

Mortgage mistakes

One of the most common mistakes that buyers make when it comes to their mortgage is to fail to shop around for a lender. In fact, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau found that only half of all buyers considered more than one lender for their home.

Buyers, first time and repeat, often think their credit report is set in stone. What they don’t realize is that the three main credit Bureaus (Experian, Equifax, and TransUnion) can all make mistakes on your credit. Check your detailed credit reports and fix any errors long before applying for a mortgage to increase your chances of getting a good rate.

If you avoid these common mistakes and continue to do your research along the way, you should be able to save yourself some headaches and some money in the long term.

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Posted by McClintick Real Estate, Inc. on 3/1/2018

Adding a quality home to the real estate market offers no guarantees. And if you fail to set a competitive initial asking price for your residence, your home may linger on the housing market for many weeks or months. Fortunately, we're here to teach you about the real estate sector and ensure you can use your home's initial asking price to differentiate your residence from the competition.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to help you establish the right price for your house prior to listing your residence.

1. Analyze the Housing Market

The housing market is tough to navigate, particularly for a seller who wants to separate his or her residence from the crowd. Thankfully, an informed home seller can review housing market data and use this information to establish a price range for his or her house.

A home seller who assesses the real estate sector can differentiate a buyer's market from a seller's one. This seller will collect and analyze housing market data related to the prices of recently sold residences and how long these houses were listed before they sold. Then, this seller can determine whether he or she is preparing to enter a buyer's or seller's market.

2. Conduct a Home Inspection and Appraisal

Although a home inspection usually is requested by a buyer after a seller accepts an offer to purchase, it may be beneficial for a seller to conduct an inspection before listing a home. An inspection enables a seller to identify problem areas in a residence. As a result, a seller can use an inspection report to prioritize home improvement projects, complete home repairs and boost the value of his or her house.

A home appraisal also may prove to be exceedingly valuable to a seller. In fact, an appraisal provides a seller with a property valuation that he or she can use to establish a competitive initial home asking price.

3. Hire a Real Estate Agent

There is no telling how homebuyers will respond to a new house that becomes available. Lucky for you, a real estate agent can help you plan ahead to list your house and ensure you can establish a competitive price for your home from day one of the property selling journey.

A real estate agent is an expert resource that you can leverage when you sell your house. He or she can help you review housing market data from a variety of sources. Furthermore, a real estate agent can put you in touch with the top home inspectors and appraisers. Perhaps best of all, a real estate agent takes the guesswork out of pricing a house and will help you set an initial home asking price that matches buyers' expectations.

When it comes to selling your house and maximizing its value, there is no need to work alone. If you hire a real estate agent today, you can get the help you need to showcase your residence to prospective buyers and boost the likelihood of a profitable home sale.

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Posted by McClintick Real Estate, Inc. on 2/22/2018

A home showing may prove to be exceedingly valuable, regardless of whether you're actively searching for a residence or preparing to enter the real estate market. In fact, there are many reasons to schedule a home showing, and these include:

1. You think a home may be right for you.

If you review a home listing and feel a house may be your dream residence, it never hurts to set up a home showing. By visiting a residence, you can get an up-close look at a house and determine whether this home is right for you.

Ultimately, the only thing that a home showing will cost you is time. If you find that a home matches or exceeds your expectations, you can always submit an offer on this residence after a showing. Conversely, if a home falls short of your expectations during a showing, you can continue your search for your ideal house.

2. You are interested in learning about the local housing market.

Let's face it – the housing market can be tricky to navigate, particularly for those who intend to purchase a home for the first time. Luckily, a home showing offers a commitment-free opportunity to examine a residence and learn about the local real estate market.

Typically, a home showing allows you to review a house in-person and ask questions about this residence. Once the showing is complete, there is no obligation to move forward with a home purchase. Instead, you can assess your homebuying options and proceed accordingly.

3. You want to narrow your home search.

Although you know that you want to buy a house, you still have lots of ideas about what you want from your ideal residence. Thankfully, a home showing gives you an opportunity to walk through a house and determine what you like and don't like. And even if you decide not to proceed with a home offer, you can use the insights from a home showing to hone your house search.

If you need help setting up a home showing, you may want to reach out to a local real estate agent sooner rather than later. Because if you have a real estate agent at your side, you can check out a wide range of residences and boost the likelihood of discovering your dream home.

A real estate agent can help you get ready for a home showing and offer plenty of insights into the housing market. This professional also will walk through a house with you during a showing and is prepared to respond to any concerns or queries. Perhaps best of all, if you want to submit an offer on a house after a showing, a real estate agent will make it simple to put together a competitive homebuying proposal.

Make your homeownership dream come true – attend a house showing, and you can increase your chances of finding a terrific residence that you can enjoy for years to come.

Tags: Buying a home   showing  
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Posted by McClintick Real Estate, Inc. on 2/15/2018

In the quest to find a new home that you love, there are two fundamental things you must know: how much you can realistically afford to spend and what you need to be happy.

Qualifying for a mortgage is one of the first hurdles on the road to home ownership, but loan approval doesn't necessarily mean you can comfortably afford a house you have your eye on.

There are other expenses to factor into the equation, such as closing costs, the down payment, school and property taxes, possible HOA fees, and maintenance costs.

If a house you're considering needs a lot of repairs, updating, and decorating, for instance, those projects could take a big bite out of your bank account and household budget. First-time home buyers and growing families moving into larger homes often have to consider the cost of furniture, new window treatments, and painting supplies. People moving from an apartment or condo to a house may also need to buy a lawnmower, tools, and property maintenance machinery (weed whackers, leaf blowers, snow blowers, etc.)

Once you've determined that you can absorb all those costs without being "house poor," the next step is creating a list of requirements, preferences, and lifestyle goals. For example, if privacy is important to you, you'll need to narrow your search to homes that have a sufficient amount of frontage and space between neighbors and streets. Fences, privacy hedges, and mature trees could also help provide you with the kind of living environment you're looking for.

While the emotional appeal of a house is an important aspect of home-buying decisions, the location of a property and the amount of living space it provides will play a central role in your level of satisfaction. In addition to having enough bedrooms, bathrooms, and storage space, you may also want to consider things like the home's architectural style and whether the floorplan is to your liking.

Many families prioritize the quality of the school district, the look and feel of the neighborhood, and the distance from shopping centers, recreation, and needed services. Also highly desirable is a daily commute to work that isn't too grueling or time consuming!

Since everyone has different goals and needs when it comes to finding the ideal home, there's no one-size-fits-all strategy for zeroing in on the house of your dreams. Although there are a lot of websites that provide great ideas on everything from flooring and countertops to cabinetry and room color, having your real estate agent show you houses that match your specifications is the most productive thing you can do.

Getting out there and physically viewing and walking through houses in your price range will eventually lead you to the home that's just right for you and your family. It's a process in which you need to immerse yourself, but with a little persistence and a clear idea of what you want, you're sure to find the home that checks off most (if not all) of the boxes on your priority and wish lists!

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